Event Calendar

We do not organise or endorse these events ourselves. Events are organised by individuals or groups who want to celebrate LGBT History Month; the organisers of each event are solely responsible for their own event. We publish these details for your own information only.

Feb
7
Wed
#DMUpride at the Phoenix: Tomboy (U) @ Phoenix Cinema
Feb 7 @ 6:00 pm

Ten-year-old Laure moves to a new Paris neighbourhood with her family. Telling people her name is Mikael, she spends an exciting summer as a boy. Wonderfully heartfelt, uplifting and free of clichés, Celine Sciamma’s tender exploration of identity is made all the more memorable by Zoé Héran who is revelatory as Laure/Mikael, delivering an outstanding performance that made Tomboy one of the best films of 2011.

Feb
9
Fri
Queercore: How to Punk a Revolution + After Party @ Showroom Cinema
Feb 9 @ 7:30 pm
Queercore: How to Punk a Revolution + After Party @ Showroom Cinema | England | United Kingdom

What happens when the community you need is not the community you have? Tell yourself it exists over and over, make fan zines that fabricate hordes of queer punk revolutionaries, create subversive movies, and distribute those movies widely—and slowly, the community you’ve fabricated might become a real and radical heartbeat that spreads internationally. This is the story that Queercore tells, from the start of a pseudo-movement in the mid-1980s, intended to punk the punk scene, to the widespread rise of artists who used radical queer identity to push back equally against gay assimilation and homophobic punk culture.

Interviewees discuss homophobia, gender, feminism, AIDS, assimilation, sex, and, of course, art. The extensive participant list includes Bruce LaBruce, G.B. Jones, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, John Waters, Justin Vivian Bond, Lynn Breedlove, Silas Howard, Pansy Division, Penny Arcade, Kathleen Hanna, Kim Gordon, Deke Elash, Tom Jennings, Team Dresch, and many more. Encompassing a breadth of history and influence, Queercore ends with a glimpse towards Riot Grrl and artists like Peaches and The Gossip, who, inspired by queercore legacy, were next to take the stage.

Underscoring the interviews are clips from movies, zines, concerts, and actions iconic to the movement. As steeped in the radical queer, anti-capitalist, DIY, and give-no-fucks approach as queercore itself, the movie reveals the perspectives and experiences of bands, moviemakers, writers, and other outsiders, taking audiences inside the creation of the community—and art—so desperately needed by the same queers it encompassed.the start of a pseudo-movement in the mid-1980s, intended to punk the punk scene, to the widespread rise of artists who used radical queer identity to push back equally against gay assimilation and homophobic punk culture.
+ Friday Night After Party: Non-Conformist Thrust with DJ Anna Kissed

Feb
10
Sat
Working Girl (1988) @ Hyde Park Picture House
Feb 10 @ 8:00 pm
Working Girl (1988) @ Hyde Park Picture House | England | United Kingdom

Alongside An Officer and a Gentleman, Working Girl was one of the fabulous 80s romances on the list of films which inspired God’s Own Country director Francis Lee. With power performances by Melanie Griffith and Sigourney Weaver (not to mention good old Harrison as the love interest) Working Girl is a fun romance with a clear message about finding one self. It’s also got one of Joan Cusack’s greatest ‘best friend’ turns. What’s not to love?

DIRECTOR: Mike Nichols
DETAILS: US, 1988, 113mins, 15
STARRING: Melanie Griffith, Sigourney Weaver, Harrison Ford
F-RATED: No
To see more about the F-Rating please visit http://f-rated.org

Every February the UK celebrates LGBT History Month and we like to curate a season of films to mark the occasion. This year we decided to use as a jumping off point one of our favourite love stories of 2017, God’s Own Country. God’s Own Country won great acclaim in 2017 on the festival circuit with awards at both Berlin and Sundance. It was also a firm favourite amongst everyone here at the Picture House. While the depth of the film’s narrative clearly struck a chord with many I think the key to its success was how well it captured love in glorious, messy, passionate, and tender technicolour. Consequently, it’s perhaps unsurprising that when we asked the Director of the film, Francis Lee, what films inspired his feature debut, he gave us a fabulous list of 80s romances, all big hair and washed denim, alongside some of the best in contemporary Queer British cinema. From this longlist we have selected My Beautiful Laundrette (1984) and Working Girl (1988) to play alongside Gods Own Country and two of our other explorations of romantic love, Call My By Your Name (2017) and Carol (2015). As a group the five will hopefully play off one another, reminding us that however scary the wider world may look when living in love everything is achievable.

Accessibility: Level access is available to the stalls via the Brudenell Road fire exit. There are four wheelchair spaces in the auditorium. Sadly at this time our toilets are not accessible via wheelchair.

Soundtrack amplification through headset is available for all titles. Just ask a member of staff.

The Hyde Park Picture House will soon be undertaking major refurbishments. As part of this, we will be greatly improving access to the venue and will be reopening with non-gendered toilets. In the meantime, we appreciate the patience of our audience and fully support our audience using whichever toilet they feel most comfortable with.

Feb
11
Sun
Call Me By Your Name (2017) & God’s Own Country (2017) – Double Bill @ Hyde Park Picture House
Feb 11 @ 3:00 pm
Call Me By Your Name (2017) & God's Own Country (2017) - Double Bill @ Hyde Park Picture House

There are plenty of differences between Call Me By Your Name and God’s Own Country but as we present the pair here in a double bill we want to explore the key similarity, the ways in which both capture the agony and the ecstasy of young love. The first glances, the nuances of communication, the relationship to body and self. Never before have sun drenched Italy and the foggy Yorkshire Dales felt quite so indistinguishable.

Every February the UK celebrates LGBT History Month and we like to curate a season of films to mark the occasion. This year we decided to use as a jumping off point one of our favourite love stories of 2017, God’s Own Country. God’s Own Country won great acclaim in 2017 on the festival circuit with awards at both Berlin and Sundance. It was also a firm favourite amongst everyone here at the Picture House. While the depth of the film’s narrative clearly struck a chord with many I think the key to its success was how well it captured love in glorious, messy, passionate, and tender technicolour. Consequently, it’s perhaps unsurprising that when we asked the Director of the film, Francis Lee, what films inspired his feature debut, he gave us a fabulous list of 80s romances, all big hair and washed denim, alongside some of the best in contemporary Queer British cinema. From this longlist we have selected My Beautiful Laundrette (1984) and Working Girl (1988) to play alongside Gods Own Country and two of our other explorations of romantic love, Call My By Your Name (2017) and Carol (2015). As a group the five will hopefully play off one another, reminding us that however scary the wider world may look when living in love everything is achievable.

Accessibility: Level access is available to the stalls via the Brudenell Road fire exit. There are four wheelchair spaces in the auditorium. Sadly at this time our toilets are not accessible via wheelchair.

Soundtrack amplification through headset is available for all titles. Just ask a member of staff.

The Hyde Park Picture House will soon be undertaking major refurbishments. As part of this, we will be greatly improving access to the venue and will be reopening with non-gendered toilets. In the meantime, we appreciate the patience of our audience and fully support our audience using whichever toilet they feel most comfortable with.

Feb
14
Wed
Film Night: LGBT Britain @ Gants Hill Library
Feb 14 @ 6:30 pm
Film Night: LGBT Britain @ Gants Hill Library | England | United Kingdom

Britain’s LGBT history is the inspiring subject of our film night. Come along and view a moving and fascinating collection of films spanning 1909 to 1994. The films document a century in which homosexuality went from crime to Pride, via decades of profoundly courageous activism, and charts the shifting attitudes to LGBT people and their rights across the board throughout a time of explosive social change.
Featuring some of the earliest known representations of LGBT people on screen, the collection begins with a 1909 film featuring a drag queen competing for a prize, while later films explore the struggles and identity politics of the ‘80s and ‘90s, including early AIDS victims recounting their painful experiences, and the fight for transgender rights in the European Court. It’s a wonderful collection, a social document encompassing both the collective public fight for basic rights and equality and more personal, intimate and psychological ones: the shedding of shame and the ability to be open about one’s most private self; the claiming of the right to love and to say publicly, proudly: this is who I am.
Film collection supplied by the Independent Cinema Office (ICO) a registered charity bringing non-commercial films to audiences who may not normally have access to them. In collaboration with the British Film Institute they have launched Britain on Film on Tour – a brand new series of archive film programmes featuring extraordinary treasures from archives across the UK, available to the British public for the first time.
Please note: the programme contains a sequence of flashing lights which might affect audience members with photosensitive epilepsy.
Free. Just turn up. Popcorn will be provided.
Information: Contact Rhonda on 020 8708 2409 or email rhonda.brooks@visionrcl.org.uk.

The Handmaiden @ The Place Theatre, Bedford
Feb 14 @ 7:00 pm
The Handmaiden @ The Place Theatre, Bedford | England | United Kingdom

From visionary director Park Chan-wook (Oldboy and Stoker) comes The Handmaiden, a sumptuous and exhilarating period thriller inspired by Sarah Waters best-selling novel ‘Fingersmith’.

Set during the Japanese occupation of Korea in the 1930s, a young handmaiden named Sookee (Kim Tae-ri) is hired by Hideko (Kim Min-hee), a reclusive heiress who lives in a sprawling mansion under the watchful eye of her domineering Uncle Kouzuki (Cho Jin-woong). But Sookee harbours a secret: she has been recruited by Fujiwara (Ha Jung-woo), a scheming con artist posing as a Japanese Count, to trick Hideko into entrusting him with her fortune. However, when Sookee and Hideko begin to develop unexpected emotions for each other, they start putting together a plan of their own.

With breath-taking visuals, grandiose set design and frenzied humour, The Handmaiden is one of the years most anticipated films – an opulent and labyrinthine tale of deception, romance and triple-crossing that marks a career high for one of modern cinemas most thrilling auteurs.

VALENTINE’S SPECIAL – My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) @ Hyde Park Picture House
Feb 14 @ 8:30 pm
VALENTINE'S SPECIAL - My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) @ Hyde Park Picture House

Stephen Frears delightfully transgressive love story, My Beautiful Laundrette, is also a work of social realism that dared to address racism, homophobia and socio political marginalization in Thatcher’s England.

30 years after it’s original release this culture clash comedy about a young Pakistani man who opens an upscale laundromat in South London aided by an old friend, has lost none of it’s original subversive or it’s romantic energy.

DIRECTOR: Stephen Frears
DETAILS: UK, 1985, 97mins, 15
STARRING: Daniel Day-Lewis, Saeed Jaffrey, Gordon Warnecke
F-RATED: No

To see more about the F-Rating please visit http://f-rated.org/

Every February the UK celebrates LGBT History Month and we like to curate a season of films to mark the occasion. This year we decided to use as a jumping off point one of our favourite love stories of 2017, God’s Own Country. God’s Own Country won great acclaim in 2017 on the festival circuit with awards at both Berlin and Sundance. It was also a firm favourite amongst everyone here at the Picture House. While the depth of the film’s narrative clearly struck a chord with many I think the key to its success was how well it captured love in glorious, messy, passionate, and tender technicolour. Consequently, it’s perhaps unsurprising that when we asked the Director of the film, Francis Lee, what films inspired his feature debut, he gave us a fabulous list of 80s romances, all big hair and washed denim, alongside some of the best in contemporary Queer British cinema. From this longlist we have selected My Beautiful Laundrette (1984) and Working Girl (1988) to play alongside Gods Own Country and two of our other explorations of romantic love, Call My By Your Name (2017) and Carol (2015). As a group the five will hopefully play off one another, reminding us that however scary the wider world may look when living in love everything is achievable.

Accessibility: Level access is available to the stalls via the Brudenell Road fire exit. There are four wheelchair spaces in the auditorium. Sadly at this time our toilets are not accessible via wheelchair.

Soundtrack amplification through headset is available for all titles. Just ask a member of staff.

The Hyde Park Picture House will soon be undertaking major refurbishments. As part of this, we will be greatly improving access to the venue and will be reopening with non-gendered toilets. In the meantime, we appreciate the patience of our audience and fully support our audience using whichever toilet they feel most comfortable with.

Feb
15
Thu
#DMUpride at the Phoenix: Tongues Untied (18) @ Phoenix Cinema
Feb 15 @ 6:30 pm

A seminal documentary on Black gay life, presented in partnership with the Institute of
Contemporary Arts’ Artists’ Film Club. Directed by Emmy award-winning Marlon T Riggs, Tongues Untied uses poetry, personal testimony, rap and performance to describe the homophobia and racism facing Black gay men.

Two Soft Things, Two Hard Things screening @ John Henry Brookes Lecture Theatre
Feb 15 @ 7:00 pm
Two Soft Things, Two Hard Things screening @ John Henry Brookes Lecture Theatre | United Kingdom

Oxford Brookes University Documentary Club and Oxford Brookes LGBT+ Staff Forum are screening TWO SOFT THINGS, TWO HARD THINGS to celebrate LGBT+ History Month.

“As a small group in Nunavut, Canada prepare for a seminal LGBT Pride celebration in the Arctic, the film explores how colonization and religion have shamed and erased traditional Inuit beliefs about sexuality and family structure and how, 60 years later, a new generation of Inuit are actively ‘unshaming’ their past.”

The Documentary Club screens documentaries made by independent film makers addressing a wide range of cultural, political and social issues. This is intended to broaden the perspectives of Brookes students and to engage with the broader community beyond OBU.

All About My Mother (1999) @ Howard Assembly Rooms
Feb 15 @ 7:30 pm

“All About my Mother is about love, parenthood, friendship and identity, about acting roles, and re-creating oneself from scratch.
Almodovar’s most tender and affecting film is a portrait of Manuela, a hard-working single mother whose 17 year old son dies suddenly.
Manuela is beside herself with grief and decides to return to Barcelona to tell the boy’s transgender father Lola about the death of the son she never knew she had.

Screened to complement Opera North’s Don Giovanni and as part of LGBT history month.

Tickets £5 available from the Opera North box office; or book online at https://www.operanorth.co.uk/productions/all-about-my-mother

Little Reliance Cinema – Desert Hearts @ The Reliance
Feb 15 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Little Reliance Cinema - Desert Hearts @ The Reliance

We’re celebrating LGBT History Month with a landmark film in the history of gay cinema, Donna Deitch’s 1985 debut feature Desert Hearts.

Based on Jane Rule’s 1964 novel Desert of the Heart, Deitch’s adaptation tells the story of Professor Vivian Bell (Helen Shaver) who comes to stay at a guest ranch in Reno, Nevada, in order to process her divorce. Here she meets and falls for free-spirited artist Cay Rivvers (Patricia Charbonneau). Set against a majestic desert landscape, the film was groundbreaking in its positive portrayal of romance between two women.

Deitch said: ‘At the time I bought the rights to the book, there hadn’t been a film about a relationship between two women that hadn’t ended in suicide […] or in a bisexual triangle. I wanted to make just a love story, like any other love story between a man and a woman, handled in a frank and real way.’

What better way to continue the Valentine’s Day vibes than with this heartfelt romance and beautifully evocative portrait of 1950s America, set to a perfect soundtrack of Patsy Cline, Buddy Holly, Jonny Cash and Gene Vincent.

Donna Deitch // US // 1985 // 96 mins // Certificate 18

Accessibility: The cinema room is at the back of the restaurant, which is up four steps. There is an accessible toilet on ground level.

Feb
18
Sun
Carol (2015) on 35mm @ Hyde Park Picture House
Feb 18 @ 1:30 pm
Carol (2015) on 35mm @ Hyde Park Picture House

Alongside Call Me By Your Name and God’s Own Country, Carol is one of our favourite love stories of the past ten years.

Haynes sophisticated and dreamy film about a young photographer who develops a relationship with an older woman in 1950s New York captures perfectly the exhilaration of falling in love, whatever your age.

DIRECTOR: Todd Haynes
DETAILS: US, 2015, 118mins, 15
STARRING: Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Sarah Paulson
F-RATED: Yes

To see more about the F-Rating please visit http://f-rated.org/

Every February the UK celebrates LGBT History Month and we like to curate a season of films to mark the occasion. This year we decided to use as a jumping off point one of our favourite love stories of 2017, God’s Own Country. God’s Own Country won great acclaim in 2017 on the festival circuit with awards at both Berlin and Sundance. It was also a firm favourite amongst everyone here at the Picture House. While the depth of the film’s narrative clearly struck a chord with many I think the key to its success was how well it captured love in glorious, messy, passionate, and tender technicolour. Consequently, it’s perhaps unsurprising that when we asked the Director of the film, Francis Lee, what films inspired his feature debut, he gave us a fabulous list of 80s romances, all big hair and washed denim, alongside some of the best in contemporary Queer British cinema. From this longlist we have selected My Beautiful Laundrette (1984) and Working Girl (1988) to play alongside Gods Own Country and two of our other explorations of romantic love, Call My By Your Name (2017) and Carol (2015). As a group the five will hopefully play off one another, reminding us that however scary the wider world may look when living in love everything is achievable.

Accessibility: Level access is available to the stalls via the Brudenell Road fire exit. There are four wheelchair spaces in the auditorium. Sadly at this time our toilets are not accessible via wheelchair.

Soundtrack amplification through headset is available for all titles. Just ask a member of staff.

The Hyde Park Picture House will soon be undertaking major refurbishments. As part of this, we will be greatly improving access to the venue and will be reopening with non-gendered toilets. In the meantime, we appreciate the patience of our audience and fully support our audience using whichever toilet they feel most comfortable with.

Feb
21
Wed
#DMUpride at the Phoenix: Call Me By Your Name (15) @ Phoenix Cinema
Feb 21 @ 5:30 pm

Director Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash) made the breakout hit of last year with a
gorgeous sensual romance to make the heart ache. In Northern Italy in 1983, 17-year-old Elio (Timothee Chalamet), the son of a university professor, looks forward to whiling away his holidays at his family’s villa. But the arrival of handsome and charismatic American graduate student Oliver (Armie Hammer) throws off his plans and the two spend a sun-drenched summer of fledgling desire. The screening will be introduced by Professor Dominic Shellard,
Vice-Chancellor at DMU.

Feb
22
Thu
Film Screening, ‘We Have Rather Been Invaded’ by Ed Webb-Ingall @ Lomography Gallery Store Soho
Feb 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Film Screening, ‘We Have Rather Been Invaded’ by Ed Webb-Ingall @ Lomography Gallery Store Soho  | England | United Kingdom

Lomography Gallery Soho Welcomes you to this very fabulous screening of ‘We Have Rather Been Invaded’. This is a new 40-minute single-screen video made by Ed Webb-Ingall that looks at the legacy of Section 28, the role of activism and our understanding of this piece of legislation thirty years on. It is made up of archival materials and interviews with those affected by Section 28.

This screening is £5 and includes complimentary drinks & popcorn. Please call 02074341466 to book your place.

Feb
24
Sat
LGBT History Month at Leeds City Museum @ Leeds City Museum
Feb 24 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
LGBT History Month at Leeds City Museum @ Leeds City Museum

Celebrate LGBT History Month 2018 at Leeds City Museum with our FREE programme of films, stalls, activities and talks on Saturday 24th February 11am til 3pm.

All are welcome to come along and get involved!

Stalls from various LGBT groups will be set up in the Museum from 11am.

The event will also include:

– talks from Trans Leeds and West Yorkshire Queer Stories
– a great programme of short films about queer history
– craft workshops for everyone: cushion making, postcard printing and more
– a pop-up history exhibition; please bring your queer history memorabilia

“I was not born to live alone”: Britain’s first modern lesbian @ Holy Trinity Church, Goodramgate, York, YO1 7LF
Feb 24 @ 5:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Unearthed from their hiding place behind a wall in Shibden Hall, the secret diaries of pioneering Yorkshire landowner Anne Lister (1791-1840) tell the story of Britain’s ‘first modern lesbian’. Partly written in code, they detail her extraordinary life and several romantic relationships with women.
Join us for a talk from historian Helena Whitbread, who edited Anne’s diaries for publication, followed by a screening of the BBC drama The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister, starring Maxine Peake.

Organised by: The Churches Conservation Trust
Tickets: £5 via Churches Conservation Trust website
More information: Ed van der Molen (evandermolen@thecct.org.uk) | visitchurches.org.uk/york
Accessibility: Baby changing, Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Feb
25
Sun
#DMUpride at the Phoenix: God’s Own Country @ Phoenix Cinema
Feb 25 @ 5:00 pm

Captivating, bracingly open-hearted and broodingly beautiful, God’s Own Country was a standout film of 2017. Johnny Saxby (Josh O’Connor) works on his family’s isolated farm, numbing his loneliness with binge-drinking and casual sex. But when a handsome Romanian migrant worker (Alec Secareanu) arrives to help on the farm, Johnny must face up to new emotions which could change his life forever.

Feb
26
Mon
Trans+ Slumber Party: screening of Laurence Anyways @ Leicester LGBT Centre
Feb 26 @ 7:00 pm

Don your comfy clothes, bring your popcorn and snacks and settle in for a laid back screening and conversation on Laurence Anyways. The 2012 romantic drama written, edited and directed by Xavier Dolan and winner of the Queer Palm Award at 2012 Cannes Film Festival explores an impossible love story spanning across a decade, chronicling the doomed love of Fred and Laurence, as well as the trials and tribulations that they face. Part of University of Leicester LGBT+ History Month.

Feb
27
Tue
Screening of Tom of Finland @ hmvCurzon Wimbledon
Feb 27 @ 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Screening of Tom of Finland @ hmvCurzon Wimbledon

Merton LGBT+ Forum have once again partnered with Wimbledon Film Club to host a showing of the 2017 movie Tom of Finland, a biographical drama about the Finnish homoerotic artist.