Event Calendar

We do not organise or endorse these events ourselves. Events are organised by individuals or groups who want to celebrate LGBT History Month; the organisers of each event are solely responsible for their own event. We publish these details for your own information only.

Feb
2
Fri
The History of the Transgender Rights Movement in the UK @ P/L/006
Feb 2 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

A presentation/talk and resulting discussion on the history of the transgender rights movement here in the UK and also touching on Europe in general. Hosted by the co-officer and transgender convenver for the University of York’s LGBTQ Network.

Organised by: University of York LGBTQ Network
Tickets: Free, no need to book
More information: Rowen Ellis (rowensellis@gmail.com | 07498 314335) | facebook.com/yusu.lgbtq/
Accessibility: Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Feb
3
Sat
York LGBT History Month Day of Talks @ Marriott Room, York Explore Library and Archive
Feb 3 @ 9:30 am – 5:30 pm

York Explore Library and Archive will play host to a fascinating variety of free talks on all aspects of LGBT history. Visitors can drop in throughout the day to discover hidden stories and forgotten heroes, and to find out about the other exciting events taking place throughout the month of February. Hot drinks, snacks and lunch will be available to purchase from the café.

Organised by: York LGBT History Month
Tickets: Free, no need to book
More information: Jake Furby or Lisa Kelly (info@yorklgbthistory.org.uk) | yorklgbthistory.org.uk/events
Accessibility: baby-changing; gender-neutral toilets; hearing loop; wheelchair access.

9:30: Welcome

10:00: Emily Roach, ‘Tales of the City: Gay Male Authored Fiction and America’s Queer Geographies’
This paper analyses place and space in a number of contemporary works of gay male authored American fiction. I take a journey from San Francisco’s Castro District to the discotheques of Manhattan’s Greenwich Village and the beaches of Fire Island Pines. During that journey I explore theories on the unstable space of the closet, queer migration, rural queerness and critiques of the tendency to equate rural to urban geographical movement with coming of age and coming out.

10:45: Break

11:00: Eleanor Formby, ‘Charting the flip-side of progress: LGBT people’s perceptions of lost spaces and experiences in the UK’
In researching LGBT people’s understandings and experiences of communities in the UK, I found a significant proportion of people talking about the past with nostalgia in relation to places, events and experiences that have been ‘lost’ as a consequence of improved legislation and attitudes towards LGBT equalities. This shows that when there was more to, as one participant said, ‘be angry about’ some people had a greater sense of community, shared within particular venues and/or at certain times.

12:00: Lunch Break

14:00: Steven Dryden, ‘Gay UK: Love, Law, and Liberty’
Steven Dryden, curator at the British Library, will talk about the Gay UK: Love, Law, and Liberty exhibition that took place last summer (2017) and which marked 50 years since the Sexual Offences Act partially decriminalised homosexuality in the UK. How have perceptions of homosexuality changed and what impact have they had in creating distinctive and dynamic gay identities in the UK?

15:00: Ben Vincent, ‘Non-Binary Genders: Western, Non-Western, and Contemporary British Histories’
This talk gives a broad overview of gender beyond the binary of male and female, divided roughly into three sections. The first addresses gender diversity in Western contexts, exploring the connection between gender and sexuality by looking at the English Mollies. The Italian Femminielli, and Albanian sworn virgins are also discussed. A cross-cultural consideration of eunuchs then expands the scope to non-western contexts, covering a range of historical and contemporary third (fourth, and fifth!) gender categories – particularly across Asia and the Americas. The journey finishes by returning to the UK, to take a closer look at how ‘non-binary’ has manifested as a category over the last few years.

16:00: Break

16:30: Brian Ogallon and Gerald Hayo, ‘Defending LGBTQI Rights in Kenya’
Rural Africa is believed to be the bedrock of homophobia and very tough cultural practices against persons perceived to be part of the LGBTQI community. There is a common concern that the LGBTQI agenda is foreign in origin and is ‘imposed on vulnerable Africans’ from the outside. The two speakers will explore these themes
Brian and Gerald are Kenyan LGBTQI activists working in both urban and pastoral regions of Kenya. They are currently undertaking a Protective Fellowship at the University of York.

Emily Roach, Tales of the City: Gay Male Authored Fiction and America’s Queer Geographies @ Marriott Room, York Explore Library and Archive
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – 10:45 am

This talk analyses place and space in a number of contemporary works of gay male authored American fiction. I take a journey from San Francisco’s Castro District to the discotheques of Manhattan’s Greenwich Village and the beaches of Fire Island Pines. During that journey I explore theories on the unstable space of the closet, queer migration, rural queerness and critiques of the tendency to equate rural to urban geographical movement with coming of age and coming out.

Eleanor Formby, Charting the flip-side of progress: LGBT people’s perceptions of lost spaces and experiences in the UK @ Marriott Room, York Explore Library and Archive
Feb 3 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

In researching LGBT people’s understandings and experiences of communities in the UK, I found a significant proportion of people talking about the past with nostalgia in relation to places, events and experiences that have been ‘lost’ as a consequence of improved legislation and attitudes towards LGBT equalities. This shows that when there was more to, as one participant said, ‘be angry about’ some people had a greater sense of community, shared within particular venues and/or at certain times.

Steven Dryden, ‘Gay UK: Love, Law, and Liberty’ @ Marriott Room, York Explore Library and Archive
Feb 3 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Steven Dryden, curator at the British Library, will talk about the Gay UK: Love, Law, and Liberty exhibition that took place last summer (2017) and which marked 50 years since the Sexual Offences Act partially decriminalised homosexuality in the UK. How have perceptions of homosexuality changed and what impact have they had in creating distinctive and dynamic gay identities in the UK?

Ben Vincent, ‘Non-Binary Genders: Western, Non-Western, and Contemporary British Histories’ @ Marriott Room, York Explore Library and Archive
Feb 3 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This talk gives a broad overview of gender beyond the binary of male and female, divided roughly into three sections. The first addresses gender diversity in Western contexts, exploring the connection between gender and sexuality by looking at the English Mollies. The Italian Femminielli, and Albanian sworn virgins are also discussed. A cross-cultural consideration of eunuchs then expands the scope to non-western contexts, covering a range of historical and contemporary third (fourth, and fifth!) gender categories – particularly across Asia and the Americas. The journey finishes by returning to the UK, to take a closer look at how ‘non-binary’ has manifested as a category over the last few years.

Brian Ogallon and Gerald Hayo, Defending LGBTQI Rights in Kenya @ Marriott Room, York Explore Library and Archive
Feb 3 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Rural Africa is believed to be the bedrock of homophobia and very tough cultural practices against persons perceived to be part of the LGBTQI community. There is a common concern that the LGBTQI agenda is foreign in origin and is ‘imposed on vulnerable Africans’ from the outside. The two speakers will explore these themes
Brian and Gerald are Kenyan LGBTQI activists working in both urban and pastoral regions of Kenya. They are currently undertaking a Protective Fellowship at the University of York.

Feb
6
Tue
LGBT Representation in American and British Film/TV: Screenings and Discussion @ V/045, Vanbrugh College
Feb 6 @ 6:00 pm

Join Lexington Lawson (MA Digital Film and Television Production) for a screening and discussion of select clips of American and British Film/TV from its inception to now.

Organised by: York Graduate Students’ Association LGBTQ Network
Tickets: Free, no need to book
More information: Toby Gormley (lgbt@yorkgsa.org) | yorkgsa.org
Accessibility: Baby changing, Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Feb
7
Wed
A Brief History of LGBT* and Mental Health @ Aviva Wellington Row Office
Feb 7 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Join Aviva Pride and Jake Furby as we talk about the history of Mental Health from an LGBT* perspective. We will discuss everything from the maligned approach of treating homosexuality and trans as mental disorders, through to the challenges our community currently faces around well-being.
Arrival from 17:30 for a 18:00 start, light refreshments will be provided.

Organised by: Aviva
Tickets: Free, but register at Eventbrite or email robert.gardner@aviva.com
More information: Rob Gardner (robert.gardner@aviva.com) | yorklgbthistory.org.uk/18/aviva
Accessibility: Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Homoerotics, Homonormativity and Big Gay Hogwarts: Queer Perspectives on the Internet’s Large Slash Fandoms @ D/L/006, Derwent College, University of York
Feb 7 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm

In the days of 1970s media fandom, fandom participation was a subversive practice. In 2018 fandom is mainstream. Terms like “shipping” are well known and interaction between fandom and its objects/creators is commonplace. This paper takes a journey from 1974 to 2018, using big slash (M/M) pairings from the Internet’s largest fandoms to interrogate the queerness of those virtual spaces. Part paper, part discussion, I consider changing platforms, toxic activism and the collapse of the fourth wall.

Organised by: Emily Roach
Tickets: Free, no need to book
More information: Emily Roach (emilyroach92@yahoo.co.uk)
Accessibility: ASK

Feb
8
Thu
Soldiers in Love @ University Centre Shrewsbury
Feb 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Soldiers in Love @ University Centre Shrewsbury | England | United Kingdom

he Presentation is based on numerous love letters between two servicemen, one of whom, Gilbert, (who later became a Bombardier), was stationed at Park Hall Camp near Oswestry during WW2.

The letters, found in a trunk in Brighton, after Gilbert’s death in 2008, were purchased, on behalf of Oswestry Town Museum, over a period of time since 2013. Initially it seemed they were to Gilbert from a girlfriend, with the initial ‘G’. The letters date from 1938.

On transcribing the letters, it became clear that they were between two men: from Infantryman, Gordon to Gilbert. The letters are very eloquent. They reveal the way in which their love was constrained by the moral and legal circumstances of the day. The resolution of this story raises further routes of enquiry in California, where Gordon went to live in the 1950s.

Both the discovery of these very rare letters, the enquiries to confirm authenticity and the journey toward publishing a book have been hugely enriching to the museum’s collection of materials relating to WW2.

Feb
9
Fri
My Tutu Went AWOL with Iestyn Edwards @ Wanstead Library
Feb 9 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
My Tutu Went AWOL with Iestyn Edwards @ Wanstead Library

“Only the divinely unique Iestyn Edwards could be in a tutu in a war zone and write about it so perfectly. Moving, fascinating and completely hilarious – it’s got it all, as has the man himself!’ Miranda Hart.
All as seen in the show of the number one best seller! How a West End cabaret star accidentally ended up in Iraq. Drying his pink ballet tights on the anti-blast wall, using his Kevlar helmet as a wash bag, ending up on the naughty tank…
Come find out more at this special event!

Feb
13
Tue
The Love that dare not speak its name @ Wanstead Library
Feb 13 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
The Love that dare not speak its name @ Wanstead Library | England | United Kingdom

Join Nick Dobson for a brief history of gay literature featuring five of the greatest writers in the English Language including Oscar Wilde and E. M. Forster.

Feb
14
Wed
A Brief History of Language and Sexuality @ D/L/002, Derwent College, University of York, York YO10 5DD
Feb 14 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

This talk by Helen Sauntson from York St John University provides an overview of the development of the field of language and sexuality. The talk traces the origins of the field back to Polari and ‘gay code’ studies through to its contemporary contributions to understanding ‘queer’ identities in applied contexts such as schools.

Organised by: The Department of Language and Linguistic Science, University of York
Tickets: Free, no need to book
More information: Eva Zehentner (eva.zehentner@york.ac.uk | 01904 322661)
Accessibility: Hearing loop, Wheelchair access

Feb
17
Sat
Near and Far… The Fight For LGBT Equality @ Hinckley Library
Feb 17 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Near and Far... The Fight For LGBT Equality @ Hinckley Library | England | United Kingdom

Join Mathew Hulbert, local LGBT+ activist and campaigner as he speaks about the importance of LGBT History Month and what it means to Hinckley and Bosworth. All are welcome to this free event. Refreshments provided.

Feb
19
Mon
“Believe me, the end is only the beginning” – The Trial of ‘The Well of Loneliness’ @ DG/014, De Grey Court, York St John University, Lord Mayor's Walk, York YO31 7EX
Feb 19 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

90 years ago, in November 1928, a magistrate ordered the destruction of Radclyffe Hall’s book, ‘The Well of Loneliness’. This session for LGBT History Month will take a light-hearted look at the book, the trial and subsequent impact – from my personal perspective. As Radclyffe Hall said, as she left the trial, “Believe me, the end is only the beginning.” How true is that?!

Organised by: Dr Fiona Thompson
Tickets: Free, book at yorklgbthistory.org.uk/18/believe-me
More information: Mand Towell (m.towell@yorksj.ac.uk | 01904 876913)
Accessibility: Baby changing, BSL/English interpretation, Gender-neutral toilets, Hearing loop, Wheelchair access

LGBT History Month lecture – Global LGBT Inclusive Human Rights @ Share Lecture Theatre, Fusion Building
Feb 19 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
LGBT History Month lecture - Global LGBT Inclusive Human Rights @ Share Lecture Theatre, Fusion Building | England | United Kingdom

Join Students’ Union at Bournemouth Union and Bournemouth University as we present our LGBT History Month public lecture with Stuart Milk.

Stuart Milk is an international human rights activist and youth advocate. He is the co founder and Executive Chair of the Harvey Milk Foundation. As the nephew of Harvey Milk, the iconic civil rights leader, Stuart has taken his uncle message of authenticity, example of courage and the power of collaboration onto the global stage supporting local, regional and national human rights struggles and emerging LGBT communities on the ground in over 60 nations on six continents.

Stuart, was the official surrogate on LGBT rights for US President Barack Obama and he successfully led campaigns for the establishment of the now annual Harvey Milk Day state holiday in California, he accepted the highest civilian honor in the US, the Medal of Freedom on behalf of his uncle, from President Obama. He has led historic campaigns to have Harvey memorialized on a US Postage forever stamp and a newly commissioned US Navy ship, the first LGBT person to receive either honor.

Everyone is welcome to attend this public lecture however the ‘BU rules of admission and conduct’ apply.

Please see these detailed below, by registering a ticket for this event you agree to be bound by these rules of admission and conduct.

Rules of admission and conduct at our events
BU would like everyone attending the event to enjoy it. With this in mind, BU expects all attendees to comply with the standards set out below. BU shall be entitled to end your booking and refuse admission or ask you to leave the event (without a refund) if you do not comply with any of these rules.

Rules of admission:

  • Where the event has a minimum age limit, we will be entitled to ask any attendee (who we believe may not meet that age limit) for proof of their age and to refuse entry if sufficient proof is not provided. Any age restrictions will be made clear to you as part of the event booking details before you book on to the event.
  • Where the event is suitable for children they must be accompanied by an adult.
  • Assistance dogs are welcome but other animals are not permitted at the event unless otherwise stated.
  • We reserve the right to delay or refuse to admit latecomers.
  • Please make us aware of any special requirements you have for the event as soon as possible so that we can look to put in place any reasonable adjustments required.

Rules of conduct:

You must:

  • follow all reasonable instructions given by our staff during the event;
  • conduct yourself in a professional and courteous manner towards all other event attendees, organisers and presenters;
  • not record images and/or sound at our event and ensure that mobile phones and other electronic devices are set to silent or switched off during the event, unless we confirm otherwise at the start;
  • not behave in any way which might pose a risk to the safety of or cause annoyance or nuisance to other persons; and
  • not smoke at the event.
Feb
20
Tue
York Centre for Writing hosts Michael Amherst author of Go the Way Your Blood Beats: On Truth, Bisexuality and Desire @ DG/017, De Grey Court, York St John University, Lord Mayor's Walk, York YO31 7EX
Feb 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

York Centre for Writing hosts a reading and Q&A with Michael Amherst from his new non-fiction book. Using bisexuality as a frame Go the Way Your Blood Beats: On Truth, Bisexuality and Desire questions the division of sexuality into straight and gay in a timely exploration of the complex histories and psychologies of human desire. Part essay, part memoir, part love letter, Amherst asks us to see desire and sexuality as analogous with art – a mysterious, creative force.

Organised by: York Centre for Writing, York St John University
Tickets: Free, no need to book
More information: Kimberly Campanello (k.campanello@yorksj.ac.uk)
Accessibility: Baby changing, Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Feb
23
Fri
How Arena 3 Saved My Life @ University Centre Shrewsbury
Feb 23 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
How Arena 3 Saved My Life @ University Centre Shrewsbury | England | United Kingdom

In these days of Diva, dating sites and meet-ups, it’s easy to forget that as recently as fifty years ago, simply finding each other was a real challenge for lesbians. The arrival of the very first lesbian newsletter, Arena Three, in 1964 was a quiet revolution. This talk draws on the oral testimonies of older lesbians whose lives were changed by this new contact with other women like themselves.

Speaker: Jane Traies – Jane has been recording the experiences of the oldest generations of lesbians in the UK for several years now. Some of these stories feature in her book The Lives of Older Lesbians: Sexuality, Identity and the Life Course (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). She continues to collect the memories and opinions of women born before 1950 who identify as lesbian or bisexual, and her next project is to publish a collection of lesbian life-stories. Jane and some of her interviewees recently appeared in the short film Now You See Me (Esme Waldron, 2016).

Feb
24
Sat
“I was not born to live alone”: Britain’s first modern lesbian @ Holy Trinity Church, Goodramgate, York, YO1 7LF
Feb 24 @ 5:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Unearthed from their hiding place behind a wall in Shibden Hall, the secret diaries of pioneering Yorkshire landowner Anne Lister (1791-1840) tell the story of Britain’s ‘first modern lesbian’. Partly written in code, they detail her extraordinary life and several romantic relationships with women.
Join us for a talk from historian Helena Whitbread, who edited Anne’s diaries for publication, followed by a screening of the BBC drama The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister, starring Maxine Peake.

Organised by: The Churches Conservation Trust
Tickets: £5 via Churches Conservation Trust website
More information: Ed van der Molen (evandermolen@thecct.org.uk) | visitchurches.org.uk/york
Accessibility: Baby changing, Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Feb
26
Mon
Queer History and Colonialism: research presentations and Q&A with Heike Bauer @ HG/147, Holgate Building, York St John University, Lord Mayor's Walk, York YO31 7EX
Feb 26 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

How did racism and gender violence shape the emergence of modern homosexual rights? What’s the continuing impact of Section 377, which penalised homosexuality across the British Empire in 1860? Join York St John University English Literature for a public talk and Q&A. Heike Bauer uses homosexual rights activist and transgender advocate Magnus Hirschfeld to explore the limits of early rights politics. Ibtisam Ahmed studies the history, neo-colonialism and queerphobia of a law still in effect in 36 Commonwealth countries.

Organised by: York St John University English Literature
Tickets: Free, but book at yorklgbthistory.org.uk/18/queer-history-colonialism
More information: Adam Stock (a.stock@yorksj.ac.uk) | blog.yorksj.ac.uk/englishlit
Accessibility: Baby changing, BSL/English interpretation, Gender-neutral toilets, Wheelchair access

Feb
27
Tue
Sexualities in many colours and languages: LGBT+ histories across time and space @ P/L/005, Physics/Electronics Building, University of York, York YO10 5DD
Feb 27 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm

This talk will offer an introduction and some insights into the fascinating variety of sexual relationships, sexual practices, and sexual identifications which we find when we study human history. It will look at societies in different parts of the world and at different times in the past in order to show how sexual diversity has been a persistent part of human experience, while taking quite different forms in different times and places. Far from being confined to simple alternatives like “straight” versus “gay”, or “normal” versus “alternative”, humans have understood, practised, and imagined sexual possibilities in richly complex and shifting ways. By discussing particular examples the talk will provide an opportunity to consider and discuss some key aspects of the history of human sexualities.

Organised by: The University of York
Tickets: Free but must register at yorklgbthistory.org.uk/18/many-colours
More information: Chris Brunt (equality@york.ac.uk) | york.ac.uk/admin/eo/
Accessibility: Wheelchair access

Oxford Lesbian History Group Talk – Virginia Woolf’s Sapphist gossip
Feb 27 @ 8:00 pm

Share in the gossippy world of Virginia Woolf’s letters and hear what she said about women and their same-sex relationships.
The Oxford Lesbian History Group is a small, friendly and informal women’s group, with an interest in all aspects of lesbian history and culture. Meetings usually take the form of a talk given by a member of the group, but there are also sometimes discussions and social activities.