Speak its Name! Quotations by and about gay men and women

speak-its-name

A new collection of moving, amusing and inspirational quotations by and about prominent gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people, from Oscar Wilde to Tom Daley, Radclyffe Hall to Sandi Toksvig, illustrated with images from the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Description

This collection of quotations by and about gay people is a celebration of the advances in LGBT rights in the UK over the last half-century and a demonstration of the battle against oppression and prejudice that led to them. A diverse range of people from the worlds of entertainment, sport, fashion, business, science, politics and the arts share their thoughts on coming out, equality, homophobia, love, sex, promiscuity, fidelity, bullying, labels and marriage. Read more

Here is a review by Schools OUT UK (Presenters of LGBT History Month) Chair Sue Sanders:

The National Portrait Gallery has produced a stunning book which will grace any book case or – better still – table, so you can pick it up and dip into the treasure that is both photos and quotations, by and about, as they say, gay men and women (though I spotted allies and bisexuals!).

Speak Its Name is a delightful book; full of surprises and gorgeous photographs that show off the myriad cast to perfection. An introduction by Simon Callow clearly demonstrates the massive revolution we have – as LGBT and gender fluid people – seen in the last 50 years.

Christopher Tinker’s editing is to be celebrated as we learn new facts while smiling at old ones, then discover the very valuable sources and the further reading section.

We have seen very many lists of important LGBT people over the years and there will always be omissions of our particular favourites. But the richness of this book: with its sumptuous layout; useful history from Simon; and comprehensive index will enable you to discover much of the UK’s LGBT history of the last 50 or so years.

It is a wonderful beginning to the many contributions, celebrations and events we will no doubt see in the months to come as we mark the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalising of male homosexuality and its impact on our community as a whole. Thank you for putting together such a rich tapestry of our lives to inform and inspire us. We at LGBT History month salute you and we will, no doubt, use the book to support our work to Educate OUT prejudice by making LGBT people in all their diversity visible and safe.