Event Calendar

We do not organise or endorse these events ourselves. Events are organised by individuals or groups who want to celebrate LGBT History Month; the organisers of each event are solely responsible for their own event. We publish these details for your own information only.
Feb
13
Wed
Doing it in Public: Queer History beyond the Academy @ Centre for Active Learning, Francis Close Hall Campus, University of Gloucestershire
Feb 13 @ 7:30 pm
Doing it in Public: Queer History beyond the Academy @ Centre for Active Learning, Francis Close Hall Campus, University of Gloucestershire

Doing it in Public: Queer History beyond the Academy
Talk for LGBT History Month 2019 by Dr Justin Bengry, Goldsmiths, University of London.

History surrounds us. Across mass media, digital spaces, and the built environment, public history is a key site for making history both inside and outside the academy – and for making history accessible to the widest audience. Queer History is no different. Drawing on my experiences of working on major queer public history projects, including Historic England’s Pride of Place and Chanel 4’s Convicted for Love, this talk will explore first-hand the challenges and opportunities of doing queer public history. Our efforts as public historians are only ever partly about the past. They hold incredible resonance and importance in the present by highlighting long histories of gender and sexual diversity, struggle, and community building. Queer public history is important and it is urgent.

Prices
Admission for non-members – £3.00
Members and Students – Free.
Yearly Membership – £15

Everyone is Welcome

Location
Francis Close Hall

Feb
15
Fri
Text Artefact Identity: Horace Walpole and the Queer Eighteenth Century @ St Mary's University / Strawberry Hill House
Feb 15 – Feb 16 all-day
Text Artefact Identity: Horace Walpole and the Queer Eighteenth Century @ St Mary's University / Strawberry Hill House

This conference will bring together scholars and curators from the disciplines of Literature, Cultural History, Art and Architectural History, and Heritage to investigate LGBTQ perspectives on the “long” eighteenth century, and features keynotes from Walpole’s biographer, George Haggerty, and Matthew Reeve, who has written extensively on Gothic architecture, sexuality & aesthetics.

Hosted in partnership with Horace Walpole’s Gothic villa at Strawberry Hill in west London, the conference will complement a major exhibition taking place October 2018-February 2019, ‘The Lost Treasures of Strawberry Hill’, which will bring together, for the first time since 1842, masterpieces from Walpole’s collection. There will be an opportunity to visit the exhibition during the conference.

Confirmed speakers
Matthew Reeve (Queen’s University, Canada)
George Haggerty (University of California, Riverside)
Alison Oram (Leeds Beckett University)
Ulf R Hansson (University of Texas at Austin)
Daniel Orrells (Kings College London)
Maurice Howard (University of Sussex)
We invite papers exploring any aspect of queer history, culture, heritage and writing of the ‘long’ eighteenth century; there will be a particular but not exclusive focus on Horace Walpole and his circle. Please see the full Call for Papers below.

The conference will take place in the beautiful Georgian and Victorian Gothic rooms of Strawberry Hill, and there will be a formal dinner in Strawberry Hill House.

Feb
18
Mon
#WeAreTheBlackCap: Four Years Fighting – a retrospective photography exhibition with talks and films @ Castlehaven Community Association
Feb 18 @ 6:00 pm
#WeAreTheBlackCap: Four Years Fighting - a retrospective photography exhibition with talks and films @ Castlehaven Community Association

#WeAreTheBlackCap – Four years fighting: a retrospective photography exhibition, talks and films. Curated by Peter Herbert from the Arts Project and Chris Barlow & Michael Chan from Outings in Art.

The Black Cap, London’s legendary LGBTQ+ pub and cabaret venue, has been a haven and centre of queer life and culture since the early 1960s. In April 2015 it was suddenly closed to be turned into luxury flats. For nearly four years since then, then #WeAreTheBlackCap grassroots campaign has campaigned for the venue to re-open, successfully resisting numerous attempts to repurpose the building and maintaining a colourful and noisy presence outside the Black Cap nearly every Saturday since the closure.

This small exhibition looks back at the campaign so far, with a selection of lively photographs from the last four years plus talks and short films about what has been called the country’s most visible LGBTQ+ campaign.